Educational Video Workshop

Outcomes

Work as an individual or a small team to:

Educational Video Workshop print material

You may download the print material here:

Educational Video Workshop—intro and all 7 phases (PDF 4.2MB)

NOTE the videos that play within phases 4 and 6 in the PDF file. Please be sure you're using Adobe Reader version 5 or above.

Example of completed live action movie featured in EVW

EduCalm Executive - all you need is the Flash Player, probably already in your browser.

Example of completed animated movie featured in EVW

Flash video (.flv) version plays with just the regular Flash Player, probably already installed in your browser.

Flash Shockwave version - all you need is the Flash Shockwave plug-in to play this in your browser.

FTP version (Win) self-extracting zip file, original .fla movie - download, extract, then open it in Flash, or play it in Flash Player or your browser.

FTP Version (Mac), stuffit archive, original .fla movie - download, extract, then open it in Flash, or play it in Flash Player or your browser.

Copyright

Who will own the copyright for your project? It depends. If you're doing it entirely on your own, you'll own it, of course. If you are doing it for a client—even when they aren't paying—you'll want to negotiate ownership before you start.

Should you need it, here is a sample copyright assignment agreement [MS Word] you can modify to suit your and your clients' needs. This is for your use only, and there is no need to turn it in to the instructor. Be sure to use this or a similar agreement that specifies who owns the project early on in your relationship with your client.

Regardless of who owns it, if you post your video on the web, we'd be very grateful if you'd include a link back to the SDSU EDTEC department (see bottom of this page).

Phase 1: Conceiving and planning an educational video

This semester (Fall 2012) we have a number of Learning DesignLab Partners interested in recruiting you to work with them on projects dear to their hearts. Please see a listing of current Learning DesignLab projects.

Examples of some previous students' animated educational videos:

Examples of previous live action videos:

Examples "out there" on the net:

Oh, and here's a really neat trio of short movies by CNN on how to make an educational video with a mobile phone video camera.

Phase 2: Outline and treatment for an educational video

Phase 3: Scripting an educational video

Video Script Template [MS Word]

Phase 4: Storyboarding an educational video

Be sure the digital video files that you downloaded with the EVW pdf file(s) (see above) are in the same folder or directory as the EVW pdf file(s).

Video Storyboard Template [MS Word]

A wonderful short video on story boarding [Flash video]

Phase 5: Planning an educational video shoot

Generic release form for adults and minors [doc]

Instructions for using a camcorder depend on the make and model you use. For the camcorders we have available here in the department:

Phase 6: Shooting an educational video

Only for those who are including live action videotape in their project.

Be sure the digital video file "Motion.mov" that you downloaded with the EVW pdf file(s) (see above) is in the same folder or directory as the EVW pdf file(s).

Shephanie Oberle, Brian Josephson, and Bob Hoffman (clockwise from left) help set up a shot in the fall, 2001 production of Financial Planning: Saving and Investing (Photo: Ruth Greene).

NOTE: To be able to view the video in the Phase 6 text, be sure the digital video file "Motion.mov" that you downloaded in Phase 4 (above) is in the same folder or directory as the EVW pdf file.

Video shot framing practice (requires Shockwave plug-in)

Video Production Log blank

Video: The making of...—tips for organizing your shoot (984K)

A free online teleprompter if your talent has a lot to remember: http://www.cueprompter.com/

Phase 7a: Editing a live action educational video

Only for those who are including live action videotape in their project.

AtomicLearning: Great tutorials on everything from iMovie and and Final Cut Pro to MovieMaker and Premiere.

Phase 7b: Animating an educational video

Only for those who are including animation in their project. Use resources like the ones listed below to develop your educational video.

Xtranormal.com: Free and easy online animation tool.

Muvizu: Their motto is "3D animated movies in hours, not months." for Win only.

Goanimate.com: Another free and easy online animation tool.

CartoonSmart: One of many good and free (or cheap) Flash animation tutorials on the Web.

Create a realistic Flash animation lip-sync is a free tutorial that offers a pretty sophisticated yet reasonably simple way to lip-sync any drawing with your soundtrack in Flash. The same site also has some other good Flash tutorials.

CrazyTalk is a pretty inexpensive but sophisticated software for quickly animating and lip-synching still images of anything from people to potatoes. Use the free trial software with good tutorials.

AtomicLearning: Great (not free) tutorials on everything from Flash and Photoshop to iMovie and MovieMaker.

Sample Flash animation file [right-click (Win) or click-and-hold (Mac) to download ARO2.fla file for Flash MX 2004 - 600k.

Making a map or other animation that needs to draw lines on the screen? Consult this excerpt from the Flash Visual QuickStart Guide on using still or animated masks.

Some other animation resources you might find useful:

Toon Boom a variety of animation software for different needs.

Aquafadas BannerZest for creating Flash animated banners.

SWiSH Flash animation tools.

Flypaper for creating Flash content.

Noodle Flix (Mac only) to make animated talking heads

Online Tools

Open Source (FREE)

Animated GIF makers on line

Other material relevant to the Educational Video Workshop project:

Images

Other visuals

Music

Sound effects

Special effects and other production software

Video conversion utilities

Turning in your live action video on line

The preferred method of submitting your educational video assignment is to post it on YouTube, Vimeo, or the like, or as a Flash video (FLV) on your own web site. If your video includes proprietary information or there's some other reason you don't wish to "go public," you may send it to the instructor as a DVD or as a media file.

To send it as a media file, use one of these free services to send it to your instructor's email address:

Linking back to EDTEC

If you would associate you and your video with us with a link back to the SDSU EDTEC department home page, we'd be most grateful!

Here's how.

When you post your video to YouTube, Vimeo, or elsewhere, if it's appropriate, would you be kind enough to include a link (with or without comment) to the EDTEC department's home page (http://coe.sdsu.edu/edtec/)? This link would be in the web page, not in the video itself.

Not only are we proud of you and your work, and happy to be associated with you, but it will also improve the department's search engine ranking, and help attract more folks like you to our programs.

If you wish to include a comment, you could say something like:

Developed by [your name, but only if you want it to be public] as a class project for the San Diego State University Department of Educational Technology (http://coe.sdsu.edu/edtec/).