Pulitzer Prize:

A Geographical Competition for Young Reporters

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Glossary of Journalism Terms

Assignment: A particular job given to reporters by editors. Sometimes reporters suggest their own assignments, but they must get an editor's approval before beginning work.

Dateline: The place-names at the beginning of a story that tell the reader where the story occurred. A dateline includes the name of a city or town, and sometimes the country. Before high-speed transmission of data, it also included the date, which is why it is called a "dateline."

Deadline: A time given to a reporter by which he/she must turn in a story.

Editor: A journalist who works closely with reporters, giving out assignments and deadlines and helping them craft their stories.

Journalist: Someone who works in the news gathering business, such as a photographer, editor or reporter.

Newsroom: An office where journalists work.

Photographer: A journalist who takes photos.

Pulitzer Prize: Pulitzer Prizes are annual awards for achievements in American journalism, letters, drama and music. The prizes have been awarded by Columbia University in New York City since 1917, on the recommendation of a Pulitzer Prize Board. Fourteen prizes are given in journalism. The award is named after Joseph Pulitzer, American newspaper publisher, who endowed the journalism school and the awards.

Reporter: A journalist who gathers information and writes news stories.

Scoop: An advantage gained over competitors by publishing a news item first. Often, a news item itself is a called a scoop when no one else has that news item.

Source: A person who gives information to a reporter or editor.

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