Introduction | Task | Process 1 | Process 2 | Evaluation | Conclusion | Credits | Teacher Page

 

Are you concerned that your students don't have an understanding of the significant roles  in literacy education that have been played by many notable educators such as William S. Gray and William McGuffey? Are you surprised that your students believe an historical review of research begins in 1990? Does it concern you that your students do not have a thorough understanding of the relationship among comprehension, vocabulary development, language, and phonics? If you answered "yes" to any of these questions, you'll understand why I felt a need to develop this webquest for my students.

This webquest was developed to enable students to gain an understanding of the seminal research in literacy education and appreciation for the literacy educators who participate in this field. 

The design of the webquest fits into a 15 week literacy course whose goals are to enable students to become intelligent consumers and practitioners of literacy research and the researchers before them.  

As the students complete 5 assignments, they will be integrating their technology skills as they use Powerpoint, Inspiration, iMovie, Word documents, and the internet.

 

Process:

How to teach students who are engaged in completing this webquest is thoroughly explained within the Process Section, but to summarize, students will work independently, both individually and in groups to complete five tasks about notable educators:

The completion of these assignments will involve students in the integration of their literacy and technology knowledge bases.

Considerations: 

Although this webquest was designed for use at a major university in California, this webquest can be adapted for use at other universities throughout the world.  The following adaptions could be made:

  1. To make it more applicable to your audience, substitute your literacy associations and local public library in the resources section.

  2. Add additional appropriate websites and textbook resources.

  3. If you do not have access to a computer lab (i.e., smart classroom), provide additional time for students to do research at local libraries or their homes.

  4. If you do not have access to the software program, Inspiration, please utilize the old "chart paper" and "semantic map" method.
Please feel free to adapt any of the assignments to accommodate your needs, students, interests and restrictions. 

 

In addition to the hot links that have been included in this webquest, some of the texts that would support student learning are:

 

Barr, R., Kamil, M., Mosenthal, P., & Pearson, P.D. (Eds.) (1996).  Handbook of reading research, Vol. II.  Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Farstrup, A., Samuels, S.J. (Eds.) (2002).  What research has to say about reading instruction. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Flood, J., Heath, S.B., & Lapp, D. (2005).  Handbook of research on teaching literacy through the communicative and visual arts. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Flood, J., Lapp, D., Squire, J.R., & Jensen, J.M. (Eds.) (2005). Methods of research on teaching the English language arts. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Flood, J., Lapp, D., Squire, J.R., & Jensen, J.M. (2003). Handbook of research on teaching the English language arts, 2nd ed.  Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Kamil, M., Mosenthal, P., Pearson, P.D. & Barr, R. (Eds.) (2000).  Methods of literacy research: Methodology chapters from the handbook of reading research, volume III.  Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Pearson, P.D., Barr, R., Kamil, M., & Mosenthal, P.  (Eds.) (1984).  Handbook of reading research, volume I.  NY: Longman.

Ruddell, R.B., Ruddell, M.R., Singer, H. (Eds.) (1998). Theoretical models and processes of reading, 4th ed. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Ruddell, R.B., Unrau, N.J. (Eds.) (2004). Theoretical models and processes of reading, 5th ed. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Yearbooks of the National Reading Conference.